International Jazz Festival April 30

Doc Stewart

I have the honor of playing with Tony Monaco, one of the best B3 players in the world, on Sunday April 30 from 4-9 pm at the Mesa Arts Center. Admission is free. Other great artists include Stan Sorenson (guitar), Dowell Davis (drums), and Jessie McGuire (trumpet).

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Sonny Rollins Omnibook – Coming Soon!

Doc Stewart

Sonny Rollins

I’m finishing up 52 solo transcriptions of classic Sonny Rollins solos for Hal Leonard. About 230 pages of incredible solos.  Charlie Shoemake came up with the selection of tunes. Stay tuned…

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Just One of Those Sopraninos

Doc Stewart

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Goodbye King Super 20 Alto!

Doc Stewart

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Christmas Jazz Duo – “Take Two”

Doc Stewart

Jazz Christmas Carols

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Vittorio Lo Conte | CD Review

Doc Stewart

Here is a translation of a Latin review of my CD Code Blue! 

By Vittorio Lo Conte from  Music Zoom

The back cover of this disc and the inside are two photos that show Doc Stewart very funny and a nice nurse trying to revive a saxophone. Saxophonist, as stated on its website, is not only an instrumentalist of occupation but also a doctor at the Mayo Clinic in the US and from time to time is devoted to music, besides being one of the famous historical links Cannonball Adderley. Before becoming a doctor Stewart was a professional alto saxophone and until now has not lost any of his talent, as evidenced by the solos on the disc in front of the Big Band Resuscitation composed for the occasion by his former colleagues, professionals all around the United States or in the recording studio. The theme of the album is emergency medicine, that the Code Blue! and the title passes to the first four titles form a suite. Then follow their own compositions or taken by the great heritage of modern jazz, there is also a Song My Lady Sings written by Charles Lloyd, the famous tenor saxophonist under the ECM. There are plenty of standards, there is about a beautiful execution of Bohemia After Dark by Oscar Pettiford, re-arranged by Tom Kubis, the “writer” behind the big band.

The overwhelming leader’s solos, the rhythm driven by a fantastic drummer Steve Moretti, and the double bass and electric bass Kevin Axt makes the music vibrant, challenging, driven at speeds unheard of to impress the audience. Doc Stewart is obviously inspired by Cannonball Adderley, his sound on alto sax and technique is typical of the bebop era. Listening to him no one would think that it is only a second activity behind the hospital made of night shifts and emergency calls. The big band works well, sections of the winds do their job great, especially when it comes to songs from the assets of that jazz propagated by Cannonball: Here are The Sticks Adderley and Bobby Timmons Dis Here we report the old days when l’appassionato saxophone leader seems to have lung endless. There is also a bossa, Patty’s Bossa written by the leader, as proof of its technical-executive on other types of rhythms. The overall result is a great record that puts in a good mood, in which only a second after listening you can admire the technical skill of the leader and big band.

Vittorio Lo Conte

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JAZZIZ Article

Doc Stewart

JAZZIZ

Mark Holston wrote an article in the magazine JAZZIZ and has some real nice things to say about Doc Stewart’s CD Code Blue!

[Read the Article]

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Grammys | Code Blue!

Doc Stewart

Doc-Stewart_NurseNever would I have dreamed to be so honored as a jazz musician. It appears that our record Code Blue! has been submitted for Grammy consideration.

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album:
“Code Blue!” Doc Stewart’s Big Band Resuscitation

Best Instrumental Composition:
“The Code Blue Suite” Tom Kubis, composer

Best Instrumental Arrangement:
“Poor Butterfly” Matt Catingub, arranger; “The Way You Look Tonight” Matt Catingub, arranger; “Snakin’ the Grass” Tom Kubis, arranger.

Don’t ask me why, but my solos on “The Last Breath Blues” & “Patty’s Bossa” are also on the list Best Improvised Jazz Solo.  I do understand how Rich Breen, Tommy Vicari, and Bernie Grundman are up for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical.

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Ric Bang | CD Review

Doc Stewart

Ric BangJazz Scan Review by Ric Bang

Great, swinging big bands are few and far between these days. A lot of water has passed beneath the bridge since we’ve heard groups that meet the standards set by Basie, Ellington, Gillespie, Mingus, Adderley, Ferguson, Corea, GRP and Grusin. Well, weep no more; Resuscitation, a big band led by Chris (Doc) Stewart, has arrived.

Stewart is a real doctor, and has practiced that art for more than 25 years. Before that, he lived in the musical world. He was the sixth of nine children, in a family where everyone played an instrument. Born in Anaheim, California, he moved to a farm in Illinois, then back to Anaheim when he was 12 (where, incidentally, he lived in a house just doors away from his future wife, Patty). He chose the alto sax as his horn, complementing with flute during his high school days. He won a talent contest at Disneyland, and played gigs during and after his high school years.

He was good enough to work with Louie Bellson, Bill Watrous, Toshiko/Lew Tabakin and others. He and Patty were married in 1981, and for the next decade he lived two lives: playing jazz and earning a medical degree. Patty was instrumental in the success of the latter endeavor, and they recently celebrated their 33rd wedding anniversary. Doc currently practices in the ER section of the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona.

In his “spare” time, he spends hours transcribing the music of his favorite artists: all of Eddie Daniels’ solos from his To Bird, with Love LP, and all of Cannonball Adderley’s solos (the basis of Stewart’s 2005 release, Phoenix: A Tribute to Cannonball Adderley).

This new album is stunning. The big band consists of six woodwinds, six trumpets and flugelhorns, four trombones, piano/keyboard, bass and drums. Every member is a star in his own right; as just one example, Stewart and pianist Matt Catingub have played together for more than 30 years.

We begin here with the four movements of “Code Blue Suite,” written by Stewart and Tom Kubis; that vibrant wake-up call runs more than 20 minutes. The next 10 swingers consist of traditional charts used by the Cannonball Adderley Quintet and icons such as Kubis, Julian Adderley, Hal Galpar, Oscar Pettiford, Bobby Timmons and Charles Lloyd. The two American Songbook standards are Kern’s “The Way You Look Tonight” and Hubbell’s “Poor Butterfly.” Most of the arrangements are by Stewart, Kubis and Catingub.

It all swings like crazy, and the solo work — whether by Stewart or other band members — is outstanding. I particularly enjoy the lines done by the entire woodwind sections, on “The Way You Look Tonight” and “Bohemia After Dark,” in the fashion of the old SuperSax band. All I can say is more … more … more!

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WDCB Jazz & Blues

Doc Stewart

WDCB Jazz & Blues will feature Code Blue! this Sunday at 6 pm Chicago time. The DJ is Bill O’Connell.OConnell_Bill

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